HAPPENED TODAY - On September 27, 1879, the poet and composer Cyril Scott was born in Oxton

The 12th International Cello Competition Antonio Janigro “Junior”, will be held in Zagreb from January 25 to February 1, 2020. Following, from 1 to 7 February, will be held the 7th International Cello Competition Antonio Janigro “Senior”. From both the competitions the deadline for online application is November 30, 2019, at 12 o’clock midnight (Croatian time).

This important competition is dedicated to Antonio Janigro, an Italian cellist and conductor, founder, in 1953 of the chamber group Zagreb Soloist. Janigro was born in 1918, in Milan, where he studied with Gilberto Crepax. Then, he moved to France where he had the opportunity to study with Casals, Dukas, Boulanger, and Stravinsky. Almost casual his meeting with Zagreb. Janigro, in 1939, was on vacation in Yugoslavia. The Zagreb Conservatory offered him a post as cello teacher and chamber music and he accepted. He thus became the “father” of the cello school in Yugoslavia, where, with Rudolf Matz, he founded an association that joined many cellists. As a soloist, he performed especially in South America and throughout Europe. As a teacher, he contributed to the formation of many of today’s great cellists, from Giovanni Sollima, to Antonio Meneses, Enrico Dindo, Mario Brunello, Thomas Demenga …

Janigro Junior

The young cellists who enroll in the “Junior” section of the competition, will be divided into 6 categories plus a pre-category (Performance in the Pre-category is not of a competitive character):

– PRE-CATEGORY        born in 2011 and younger
– 1ST CATEGORY         born 2009 and younger
– 2ND CATEGORY        born in 2007 and younger
– 3RD CATEGORY        born in 2005 and younger
– 4TH CATEGORY        born in 2003 and younger
– 5TH CATEGORY        born in 2001 and younger
– 6TH CATEGORY        born in 1999 and younger

There is a specific program for each category:

♦ PRE-CATEGORY (max 5 minutes)
– free choice program

♦ 1ST CATEGORY (max 10 minutes)
– two compositions of a different character (possibly two movements from sonata or concert) with piano accompaniment
– one piece for cello solo (etude or capriccio)

♦ 2ND CATEGORY (max 15 minutes)
– one movement from concerto or sonata (two contrasting movements in the case of an old master’s sonata)
– one piece for cello solo (etude or capriccio)
– one short composition of their own choice

♦ 3RD CATEGORY (max 20 minutes)
– one movement from concerto or sonata (two contrasting movements in the case of an old master’s sonata) with piano
– one piece for cello solo (etude or capriccio)
– a slow piece at his own choice
– a virtuoso piece of his own choice

♦ 4TH CATEGORY (max 25 minutes)
– one movement from concerto or sonata (two contrasting movements in the case of an old master’s sonata) with piano
– one piece for cello solo (etude or capriccio)
– a slow piece at his own choice
– a virtuoso piece of his own choice

♦ 5TH CATEGORY (max 30 minutes)
– one movement from concerto or sonata (two contrasting movements in the case of an old master’s sonata) with piano
– one piece for cello solo (etude or capriccio) of appropriate difficulty
– one movement from J. S. Bach: 6 Suites for violoncello solo BWV 1007 – 1012
– a slow piece of his own choice
– a virtuoso piece of his own choice

♦ 6TH CATEGORY (max 30 minutes)

1st Round
– etude or capriccio
– a slow piece of his own choice
– 1st movement from concerto for violoncello (from J. Haydn onwards)

2nd Round – Finale
– one movement from J. S. Bach: 6 Suites for violoncello solo BWV 1007 – 1012
– Sonata for Cello and Piano (in full), from L. van Beethoven onwards
– a virtuoso piece of his own choice

There are no age limits for applying to a higher age category. In each category, at least one piece must be from the country of the contestant’s education. All pieces in all categories should be performed by memory with the exception of duo sonatas for the cello and the piano. All performances must be open to the public. The Jury reserves the right to reduce the length of the performance. The judges’ decisions are irrevocable. All competitors will get a Diploma of participation. All awarded competitors will get a Diploma.

Awards
PRE-CATEGORY: Diploma of participation and souvenir
1st Category: 500 kune
2nd Category: 1.000 kune
3rd Category: 2.000 kune
4th Category: 4.000 kune
5th Category: 6.000 kune
6th Category: 8.000 kune

Special Awards
Audience Award
Antonio Janigro Foundation Award
International summer school UZMAH Award

Jury members
Hannah Suhyoung EichbergAlexander Gebert (Finland / Germany)
Monika Leskovar (Croatia), President
Milan Hudnik (Slovenia)
Fanny Nemeth Weiss (Hungary)

Official piano accompanists
Ana Granik
Domagoj Gušćić

Online application on the competition WEBSITE

Janigro Senior

♦ FIRST STAGE (max 15 minutes)

Dall’Abaco: Capriccio n.1
Thomas Buritech: Some like to show it off
Alfredo Piatti: One of the 12 capriccios

♦ SECOND STAGE (max 45 minutes)

– one sonata from the list below:

Ludwig van Beethoven:
Sonata for cello and piano No 2 in G minor Op. 5 No. 2
Sonata for cello and piano No 3 in A major Op. 69
Sonata for cello and piano No 4 in C major Op. 102 No. 1
Sonata for cello and piano No 5 in D major Op. 102 No. 2
Franz Schubert: Sonata for cello and piano “Arpeggione” in A minor D. 821
Johannes Brahms:
Sonata for cello and piano in E minor Op. 38
Sonata for cello and piano in F major Op. 99
Frederic Chopin: Sonata for cello and piano in G minor Op. 65
Cesar Franck: Sonata for cello and piano in A major
Richard Strauss: Sonata for cello and piano in F major Op. 6
Sergei Rachmaninoff: Sonata for cello and piano in G minor Op. 19
Claude Debussy: Sonata for cello and piano
Sergei Prokofiev: Sonata for cello and piano in C major Op. 119
Dmitry Shostakovich: Sonata for cello and piano in D minor Op. 40
Benjamin Britten: Sonata for cello and piano in C major Op. 65

– one composition by competitor’s choice, solo or accompanied (could be a movement of a sonata) up to the required length. No transcriptions in the second stage. Substitute solo pieces should represent the standard cello repertoire.

FINAL STAGE

– one of the following concertos accompanied by Croatian Radiotelevision Symphony Orchestra

Antonin Dvořák: Concerto in B minor Op. 104
Robert Schumann: Concerto in A minor Op. 129
Pyotr Ilich Tchaikovsky: Variations on a Rococo Theme Op. 33
Edward Elgar: Concerto in E minor Op. 85
Dmitry Shostakovich: Concerto No. 1 in E flat major Op. 107
Sergey Prokofiev: Sinfonia concertante in E minor Op. 125

An official piano accompanist will be available. Each competitor is allowed one rehearsal free of charge with the official piano accompanist for the Second Stage of the Competition. If they wish so, competitors may request more rehearsals, which will be charged. Competitors may bring their own accompanists at their expense. Each finalist will have one rehearsal with the Croatian Radiotelevision Symphony Orchestra. The Jury will choose up to six competitors for the Final Stage. The organizer will cover the cost of the accommodation for the finalists only, from the moment they enter the Final Stage. All compositions must be performed by memory, with the exception of duo sonatas. All performances shall be open to the public. The Jury reserves the right to reduce the length of the performance. Decisions of the Jury are irrevocable. All competitors will receive certificates of participation. All prize-winners will receive honorary diplomas.

Awards
1ST PRIZE: 6000 euro
2ND PRIZE: 3000 euro
3RD PRIZE: 2000 euro
4TH PRIZE: 1000 euro

Special Awards
The Zagreb Soloists Award
The Antonio Janigro Association Award
The Accord case Award
International Summer School UZMAH Award
The Croatian String Teachers Association Award
Croatian Jeunesse Musicales Award 

Jury members 
Laurence Lesser (USA)
Enrico Dindo (Italy)
Monika Leskovar (Croatia)
Jens Peter Maintz (Germany)
Suzana Stefanović (Spain)

First elimination round jury members
Thomas Buritch (Croatia)
Gal Faganel (Slovenia / USA)
Nikola Ružević (Croatia / USA)
Meehae Ryo (Korea / Austria)

Online application on the competition WEBSITE

For more details and information:

Website: https://www.janigro-competition.org/en/
E-mail: info@janigro-competition.org
Tel:
+385 (0)1 3668 – 027

On Sunday, January 21, 2018, in the Vatroslav Lisinski Concert Hall in Zagreb, a celebratory concert was held to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the birth of Antonio Janigro.

The concert, directed by Marko Magdalenic, and organized by the Antonio Janigro Association, was attended by Julius Berger, Thomas Demenga, Monika Leskovar, Zagreb Soloists, Cello Ensemble, “100 Cellists 100 Years” Orchestra.

Guests of honor Michael Flaksman and Giovanni Ricciardi who, at the end of the concert, we were lucky enough to be able to interview. We started precisely from the memory of Janigro.

 

 

Many of today’s great cellists have been, directly or indirectly, students of Janigro. What are, in your opinion, the reasons that have enabled him to obtain such excellent results with his teaching?

I think there are many reasons for this: undoubtedly his teaching ability, we realize it from the value and the amount of the technical material left, but also his humanity, the ability to see the specificity of each and to increase his skills it without flattening the personality, enhancing the natural qualities of his pupils. Then he was certainly a charismatic man, and he was also a cellist who incessantly studied the instrument.

On the Milan – Paris train, he was always looking for an empty compartment to practice or, after the concerts, he immediately stopped to study the steps he had not liked during the concert. A great humility and a great empathy for all the musicians with whom he worked, combined with his genius, were qualities that remained etched in the minds and hearts of the students, even those who met him only once.

[to be continued ⇒]